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Science Fair

Thank you to all who participated in the annual Science Fair.

Special thanks to our coordinator Lindsay Rudy for creating such a great event and to all our judges.

We appreciate your support for scientific studies!

The Fair takes place at the end of March each year.

All students are invited to complete a Science Fair project.

Projects will be evaluated by judges and certificates will be awarded to everyone who participates.

 

Hope Elementary School Science Fair 2018

 

The Hope Elementary Science Fair will take place on Thursday, March 22nd in the Media Center.  Judging will take place on that day after school and students are invited to present their projects to the judges.  Certificates and Awards will be presented at the blacktop assembly on Friday, March 30th. All children who participate in the Science Fair will be recognized for their achievements.

 

Entries for the Science Fair are open to students in grades 1 through 5.  Participation is entirely voluntary, but if your child has an interest in science and wants to participate, this packet provides most of the necessary information to get started. Parents are encouraged to work with their child and help him/her complete a project.

 

If your student plans to complete a Science Fair project, he/she needs to sign up by sending an email to Lindsay Rudy (lindzrudy@yahoo.com) by Monday, March 19th. In the email, the student should state their name, grade, and project idea (this is for planning purposes, so we have enough judges).  Teams of two students are allowed.

 

Science Fair Projects:

 

  • SUPPLEMENT CLASSROOM SCIENCE EDUCATION
  • ALLOW STUDENTS TO EXPLORE A TOPIC OF THEIR PERSONAL CHOICE
  • INVOLVE HANDS-ON SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS
  • BOOST SELF-ESTEEM THROUGH SCIENTIFIC LITERACY AND ACHIEVEMENT
  • HELP DEVELOP INDEPENDENT RESEARCH
  • HELP IMPROVE WRITING, MATHEMATICAL AND ANALYTICAL SKILLS
  • PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ORAL PRESENTATION
  • PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITY TO CARRY AN IDEA THROUGH TO COMPLETION
  • HELP TEACH WORKING TO A DEADLINE
  • TEACH DOCUMENTING COMPLETE PROCEDURES
  • ALLOW FOR EXPRESSIVE, ARTISTIC PRESENTATIONS
  • AND MOST OF ALL  ---  FUN !!

 

Participating in Science Fair at the Elementary Grade Level will also help introduce and prepare your children for participating in middle school science, as the Science Fair follows Next Generation Science Standards.

 

The following timetable serves as a guideline to highlight important project milestones and to provide a step-by-step checklist for completion.

 

Project Checklist

 

  • Select a topic
  • Sign up by sending an email to Lindsay Rudy (lindzrudy@yahoo.com) by Monday, March 19th)          
  • Begin to research topic as basis for hypothesis                              
  • Design an experiment and write down procedural steps                  
  • Gather all the necessary materials and tools & execute the experiment      
  • Analyze the data and draw a conclusion                                           
  • Obtain materials for, and complete construction of display            
  • Deliver project to school Media Center  (before school on Thursday, March 22nd)
  • Take project home after the Science Fair on March 22nd or beginning of school March 23rd.                    
  • Attend  assembly on Friday, March 30th for certificates/awards.

 

What Makes a Good Science Fair Project?

 

Although the main purpose of this Science Fair is to encourage and stimulate a greater interest in science, the experience should reinforce a basic understanding and application of a logical, systematic method of scientific investigation.  In actual practice there are many methods employed by scientists to investigate solutions to questions. Grade schools typically introduce one method in particular, the classical scientific method. The scientific method can be applied to physical & life sciences, mathematics and even investigations extending beyond the realm of science. So mastering the scientific method is a valuable skill for problem solving in general. As a procedure, the scientific method can be broken down into specific, ordered steps.

 

Steps of the Scientific Method

 

  • Identify the problem or question
  • Establish a hypothesis
  • Test the hypothesis by experiment
  • Analyze the results of the experiment
  • State the conclusion

 

It is important to understand the difference between a scientific investigation and a science demonstration. While demonstrations simply illustrate a scientific fact or phenomena by means of an experiment, they do not comprise a complete scientific investigation which begins with a question, leads to a hypothesis and experiment and results in a conclusion. A good science fair project should be based on a scientific investigation rather than just a demonstration.

 

Although collections (insect, rocks, leafs, etc.) can be scientifically interesting and educational, simply displaying a collection does not qualify as a scientific investigation. A good science fair project should not be a simple display of collections.  On the other hand, collections can lead to interesting observations and may raise questions which can serve as the basis for a scientific investigation. For example, comparing the variety of coloration on insects, collected from specific locale, may provide a clue to survival aspects.

 

Project Display

 

With the essential components identified, a project display needs to be assembled using a backboard. The backboard can either be constructed or purchased, but should be stiff enough so it does not buckle or twist under its own weight and any other items attached to it. The following figures illustrate examples of display backboard constructions. It’s best to place the title in the center panel with large block letters, and arrange material so that flow of the essential components progresses from left to right – from the statement of the problem to the conclusion.  Fonts should be large enough to read from a distance of at least three feet.

 

Tables will be provided for the project displays and any other materials presented as part of the project in the school media center. Project presentations, in their entirety, should not exceed 4 ft. wide X 3 ft. deep X 4 ft. in height.

 

The display backboard provides the student with an opportunity to exercise their artistic talents. The display should be designed to attract spectators and arouse their curiosity but content is what matters most, and this is where the most effort should be spent. Keep the display neat, organized, easy to read, and make sure it includes all the essential components outlined below.

 

Essential Components of the Project Presentation

 

TITLE

Provide a descriptive title for the project that relates to the problem or question.

 

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

In one simple and concise sentence, state a question regarding a specific phenomena or occurrence observed in nature.

 

HYPOTHESIS

The hypothesis is an ‘educated guess’.  In one or more sentences predict the answer to the question you’ve posed, and based on research, references, experience or even a hunch, explain why you believe this answer to be correct.

 

EXPERIMENT

Describe the experiment used to test the validity of your hypothesis. The experiment should directly address the question posed in the hypothesis, and be designed so that its results provide clear evidence to either prove or disprove the hypothesis. Carefully determine and document all the materials and procedures required to complete the experiment.

 

RESULTS

Results are the output of the experiment. Results may include notes about observations, pictures, sketches, and numbers, also known as ‘data’.

 

ANALYSIS

Results can be reduced to graphs, calculations, logical deductions, and other methods that make experimental results more meaningful or easier to understand. This is the process of analysis.

 

CONCLUSION

Based on the experimental results, and in one or more sentences, provide a conclusion that states whether the hypothesis was either TRUE or FALSE. The conclusion can also offer further analysis or explanation on why the hypothesis is either true or false.

 

Judging

 

Science fair projects will be grouped by grade level.  Each project will be judged based on 5 major criteria and ranked on a scale of 1 to 10 with ten ranking best. Qualified scientists and/or engineers will be selected as judges from local universities, colleges and industry.

 

The judging criteria are as follows:

 

1. Originality of project

O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O

1      2     3      4     5       6       7     8      9      10

2. Project follows a logical, systematic scientific investigation

O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O

1      2     3      4     5       6       7     8      9      10

3. Project depth and level of analysis

O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O

1      2     3      4     5       6       7     8      9      10

4. Thoroughness and attention to detail

O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O

1      2     3      4     5       6       7     8      9      10

5. Neat, clear, and easy-to-read backboard display

O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O     O

1      2     3      4     5       6       7     8      9      10

 

On the day of judging, and as an option, students will have the opportunity to present their projects to the judges.

 

All participants who complete and display a science fair project will be recognized by a certificate and/or prize at the morning Assembly on Friday, March 30th.

 

Here is a helpful website to get you started on your project:

  • Science Buddies Click Here

Have fun and see you at the Science Fair!